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August 27, 2009

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preeva tramiel

When my kids were little, we grew a few soybean plants. I never got to cook the "toybeans." The kids ate them raw.

Rodney Fong

One of the reasons I chose to go to Stanford was that it didn't seem so far away from Hawaii. But some of the things I missed when I first went to California was some of the local foods my mom makes, like boiled peanuts and soy beans. I remember asking one of my dormmates freshman year if he ever had soy beans, to which he replied, "Of course" and proceeded to produce these dried white tasteless nuts. "You can even get them at the bookstore." Well, this was not what I knew as soy beans, and it wasn't until much later that edamame became a popular bar food, at least here in Hawaii. But the edamame was a lot brighter green than I remembered, as well as differing in texture. Found out that they were frozen. Unfortunately, as popular as edamame is here, it is still mainly found frozen. A trip to Chinatown or the open markets is the only way to get fresh, raw edamame. It is still one of my favorites. I can only imagine what yours must taste like. Your pieces never fail to spark some kind of memory for me, Nance. Thanks again.

Barb

The slow food event at Matsuda-san's place in October is one of my favourite memories from Japan. We have frozen edamame here and there is absolutely no comparison. You live in an amazing community, Nancy.

n merrick

Farmer's Market, tomorrow!
Thanks!
-- Nancy M.

Jo Lynn in Virginia

Edamame are here! Our Falls Church City farmer's market hosts two of my favorite ecoganic farms: Potomac Vegetable Farms and Tree and Leaf Farm. They're members of the same local CSA. Here's a recipe using fresh edamame, taken from Tree and Leaf's blog~ the hardest part is remembering to set aside enough for the stir-fry! Thanks, Nancy! ~JL

"This week I made Chive pancakes with stir fried greens, carrots and edamame. The chive pancakes were made with chickpea flour, and are very simple and fun to make.

Chive Pancakes with chickpea flower
1 cup chickpea flour
1 cup white flour (use unbleached or part whole-wheat)
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 cup chopped chives
pinch of salt
pepper to taste
enough water to make mixture the thickness of heavy cream

Mix together all dry ingredients except for chives.
whisk in water.
Set aside for one hour.

Heat pan with enough cooking oil to coat the bottom.
Pour batter sprinkle about 1 tablespoon of chives on top of pancake.
Cook first side for approximately 3 min,
flip
and cook other side for 1 min."

http://www.treeandleaffarmnews.com/

Elena Beyers

I will never eat another frozen edamame. Thank you for the education. I wonder if I can convince my brother to grow some. As for the beer, don't drink it that often but when I do, it's Mexican Negra Modelo. Thanks again Nancy. E Beyers

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